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Aboriginal Book and Video Club

June 10, 2020


End of Year Book Club Celebration

When:  Wednesday, June 10 , 2020

Where:  Skaha Lake - Beach Gazebo

Time:  3:30 -5:00

Details:  Bring a poem, short story or piece of art by an Indigenous artist/poet/writer (of Métis, Inuit or First Nations heritage).

Be prepared to share: 1) why you picked it (what spoke to you) and 2) one thing you would like to recognize from this past school year in terms of celebrating and honouring Indigenous cultures (an appreciation).

Please RSVP to Erica Fitton (efitton@summer.com)


April 22, 2020


Halfbreed

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This new edition of Halfbreed includes a new introduction written by Indigenous (Métis ) scholar Dr. Kim Anderson detailing the extraordinary work that Maria has been doing since its original publication 46 years ago, and an afterword by the author looking at what has changed, and also what has not, for Indigenous people in Canada today.  Restored are the recently discovered missing pages from the original text of this groundbreaking and significant work.  Please note this book contains sensitive content.

An unflinchingly honest memoir of her experience as a Métis woman in Canada, Maria Campbell's Halfbreed depicts the realities that she endured and, above all, overcame.  Maria was born in Northern Saskatchewan, her father the grandson of a Scottish businessman and Métis woman - a niece of Gabriel Dumont whose family fought alongside Riel and Dumont in the 1885 Rebellion, her mother the daughter of a Cree woman and French-American man.  This extraordinary account, originally published in 1973, bravely explores the poverty, oppression, alcoholism, addiction, and tragedy Maria endured throughout her childhood and into her early adult life, underscored by living in the margins of a country pervaded by hatred, discrimination, and mistrust.  Laced with sparse moments of love and joy, this is a memoir of family ties and finding an identity in a heritage that is neither wholly Indigenous or Anglo, of strength and resilience, of indomitable spirit.


When:  Wednesday, April 22, 2020

Where:  Meet at the southernmost parking lot on Riverside Dr., across from Riverside Plaza.

Time:  3:30 -5:00

Details:  Dress for the weather!  Lana Lamb, Indigenous Education Support Worker, will help lead a powerful outdoor activity to highlight some of the Métis experiences in the book.  There will be thermoses of rose-hip tea (and cups) provided.  Following the outdoor activity there will be discussion at The Station Public House (formerly the Kettle Valley Station pub).

There are limited copies available from Virginia Powell at the School Board Office - unfortunately this book is not available from the public library.

Please RSVP to Erica Fitton (efitton@summer.com)


February 19, 2020


21 Things You May Not Know About the Indian Act:  

Helping Canadians Make Reconciliation with Indigenous People a Reality

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"The Indian Act, after over 140 years, continues to shape, control, and constrain the lives and opportunities of Indigenous Peoples, and is at the root of many stereotypes that persist. Bob Joseph's book comes at a key time in the reconciliation process, when awareness from both Indigenous and non-Indigenous communities is at a crescendo. Joseph explains how Indigenous Peoples can step out from under the Indian Act and return to self-government, self-determination, and self-reliance—and why doing so would result in a better country for every Canadian. He dissects the complex issues around truth and reconciliation, and clearly demonstrates why learning about the Indian Act's cruel, enduring legacy is essential for the country to move toward true reconciliation." (Source: https://www.ictinc.ca/books/21-things-you-may-not-know-about-the-indian-act)

Reviews:

https://www.goodreads.com/en/book/show/38620150-21-things-you-may-not-know-about-the-indian-act

Additional Info:

When:  Wednesday, February 19, 2020

Where:  Princess Margaret Library

Time:  3:30 - 5:00

You can borrow a copy from Virginia Powell at the School Board Office. Pen High & PMSS both have copies at the library. 

You are welcome to look at this video interview with the author to prepare:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OhBrq7Ez-rQ&feature=emb_logo

He also has a lot of great information on his blog:

https://www.ictinc.ca/blog

https://www.ictinc.ca/ict-team/bob-joseph

Please RSVP to Erica Fitton (efitton@summer.com)


November 13, 2019


The Grizzlies

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 Inuit youth in a small community gain a powerful sense of pride and purpose through the sport of lacrosse, in this true-story account of tenacity, renewal, and inspiring resilience.

Based on a true story, The Grizzlies is about the determination and resilience of a group of Inuit youth in a small Arctic community.

In 1998, first-time teacher Russ Sheppard (Ben Schnetzer) moves north for a job at a local school in Kugluktuk, a town struggling with one of the highest suicide rates in North America. With no previous experience or knowledge of life in the north, Russ is shocked and overwhelmed by the numerous social issues facing the youth, all as a result of the massive legacy of colonization on their families and communities. Russ introduces a lacrosse program in the school. Although the program is at first met with skepticism and resistance, Russ's commitment begins to win the trust of the students and together they form the Grizzlies lacrosse team. Through the sport, the youth find a vital outlet for their emotions and the team creates a sense of pride and purpose in themselves and their community.

Originally from Kugluktuk, one of the film's producers, Stacey Aglok MacDonald, has first-hand experience of the impact of this program on her community and has been committed to bringing this story to the screen in close creative collaboration with producer Alethea Arnaquq-Baril and director Miranda de Pencier. With absolutely stunning breakout performances by young Nunavut-based actors Paul Nutarariaq and Emerald MacDonald, The Grizzlies is a testament to the spirit, tenacity, and leadership of Inuit youth, persisting in spite of immense pressure and hardship.

Click here to access the movie trailerhttps://m.youtube.com/watch?v=Irf44_yM_0U

When:  Wednesday, November 13, 2019

Where:  Princess Margaret Library

Time:  3:30 - 6:00

Due to the length of the movie, pizza and popcorn will be provided!

Please RSVP to Erica Fitton by Friday, November 8th.